Culture

  • When board meetings are not enough: A poem for abolition

    At a recent city council meeting where Saskatoon approved millions more in funding for the Saskatoon Police Service, Erica Violet Lee was the only one who spoke against the increase. Rather than trying to convince those whose minds had already been made, she read a poem she had written in honour of Neil Stonechild, Kimberly Squirrel, and all the others whose lives have been stolen by colonial and carceral violence in Saskatoon.
  • The neoliberal assault on Saskatchewan

    “Divided: Populism, Polarization and Power in the New Saskatchewan” paints a picture of the last decade and a half of neoliberal governance – and its impacts on the province's most marginalized.
  • The space to tell stories

    Since the Sask Party cut a key film tax credit in 2012, a lot of ink has been spilled about the film industry’s decline. But after the tax credit was cut, there's been a groundswell of cinema by Indigenous women in Saskatchewan. How did this happen, and what can we learn about building a strong and just film industry?
  • “A symbolic step”: group calls on city of Regina to rename Dewdney Avenue

    As Indian Commissioner and lieutenant governor of Saskatchewan, Edgar Dewdney left a legacy of colonial violence and trauma on the Prairies. Now some have joined together in a campaign to remove his name from one of Regina's busiest streets.
  • Checking in two years after the end of NORTEP and NORPAC

    In 2017 the Sask Party cut funding and eliminated the Northern Teacher Education Program and the Northern Professional Access College. What's been the impact on Indigenous language learning and access to education?
  • A letter to the editor (albeit in rhyme)

    One hundred and thirty-one days is a very long time – the members are for you every step of the way. We believe in the Co-op, and what you say: with equal work comes equal pay.
  • Labour tensions flare on Sask University campuses

    Support workers at the University of Saskatchewan continue to bargain to keep their pensions and increase pay. Meanwhile, a collective agreement was reached in April between the University of Regina and the University of Regina Faculty Association (URFA).